Home About Us Delivery Rates FAQs Bulk Orders Payment Methods Login or Register Contact Us Free E-Books Send Feedback
Iqra Books NigeriaRC918498
Resources for Libraries
Browse by Category
Agric Science
Aqeedah
Arbitration Law
Arts and Photography
Audio Books
Biography and Autobiography
Body Mind and Spirit
Business and Investing
Career
Children
Comics and Graphic Novels
Common Law
Company and Commercial Law
Computers and Internet
Conflict Resolution
Culture
Economics
educative
enlightening
enlightning
Enterpreneurship
Entertainment
Family
Fatwa
Fiction
Financial Success
Fiqh
Games and Toys
General Islamic Books
Hadith
Health Mind and Body
History
Home and Garden
informative
Inspiration
Islam
Islamic Banking
Islamic Business and Economy
Islamic History
Islamic Law
Journals
Language and Science
Law
Leadership
Literature
Literature and Fiction
Magazines
Management
Mass Communication
Medicine
Mushaf Uthmani
Nigerian
Nonfiction
Outdoors and Nature
Parenting
Personal Development
philosophy
Political Science
Politics
Professional and Technical
Quran and Mushaf
Quran and Tafsir
Ramadan, Hajj and Zakat
Reference
Religion and Spirituality
Romance
Sales and Marketing
Science
Science Fiction and Fantasy
Seerah
Senior Secondary School
Sports
Survey
Survey and Geoinformatics
Tafsir
Textbooks
Theatre Art
Travel
Women
Free E-Books

Promo: Delivery rate is now N 2000 to anywhere in Nigeria.

Join Iqra Readers' Club

Share | | Previous Page

Political Order and Political Decay: From the Industrial Revolution to the Globalization of Democracy: by Fukuyama, Francis

Political Order and Political Decay: From the Industrial Revolution to the Globalization of Democracy Price: N14500
Product Code: 1420628535
Add to cart
Number of Pages: 672
Weight: 2kg
Binding: Deluxe Hardback
Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux
Edition: 2014
ISSN: 9780374227357
Availability: To be delivered within 6 to 8 working days
Summary: Political development and its three components: the state, rule of law, and accountability; why all societies are subject to political decay; the plan for the book; why it is good to have a balanced political system Political development is change over time in political institutions. This is different from shifts in politics or policies: prime ministers, presidents, and legislators may come and go, laws may be modified, but it is the underlying rules by which societies organize themselves that define a political order.

In the first volume of this book, I argued that there were three basic categories of institutions that constituted a political order: the state, rule of law, and mechanisms of accountability. The state is a hierarchical, centralized organization that holds a monopoly on legitimate force over a defined territory. In addition to characteristics like complexity and adaptability, states can be more or less impersonal: early states were indistinguishable from the ruler’s household and were described as “patrimonial” because they favored and worked through the ruler’s family and friends. Modern, more highly developed states, by contrast, make a distinction between the private interest of the rulers and the public interest of the whole community. They strive to treat citizens on a more impersonal basis, applying laws, recruiting officials, and undertaking policies without favoritism.

The rule of law has many possible definitions, including simple law and order, property rights and contract enforcement, or the modern Western understanding of human rights, which includes equal rights for women and racial and ethnic minorities.1 The definition of the rule of law I am using in this book is not tied to a specific substantive understanding of law. Rather, I define it as a set of rules of behavior, reflecting a broad consensus within the society, that is binding on even the most powerful political actors in the society, whether kings, presidents, or prime ministers. If rulers can change the law to suit themselves, the rule of law does not exist, even if those laws are applied uniformly to the rest of society. To be effective, a rule of law usually has to be embodied in a separate judicial institution that can act autonomously from the executive. Rule of law by this definition is not associated with any particular substantive body of law, like those prevailing in the contemporary United States or Europe. Rule of law as a constraint on political power existed in ancient Israel, in India, in the Muslim world, as well as in the Christian West.

Home || Delivery Rates || Terms & Conditions || Share

Iqra Books Nigeria. All Rights Reserved.
Lagos Office: 18 Adeshina Road, Ikeja; Ilorin Bookstore: 14 Umar Audi Rd., Opp. Access Bank, GRA Ilorin Office: 12 Ilofa Road, GRA
Phone: 08111023123 (Hotline), 08187142506 (Direct Line), 031-821029 (Direct Line), 08033824014, 07013137396

Email

Website Designed and Developed by Plat Technologies Limited.